Recipe: Basic Chicken Stock

What do sautéed vegetables, polenta, and chicken noodle soup have in common?

Did you figure it out?

That’s right!

They could all benefit from a dose of good ol’ fashioned chicken stock.

Chicken stock when cooked correctly should be complex, fatty but not heavy, mild yet ever so rich at the same time. It often takes hours to develop this friendship between flavors. But it is well worth the time because a good chicken stock lends itself to a myriad (For us common folks, that means “a bunch”) of things. Any dish that calls for water can benefit from the added flavor of the stock. Well, I probably wouldn’t recommend using it in chocolate chip cookies or coffee. But hey, to each their own.

If you’ve tried cooking homemade stock, you know it’s one of the most rewarding recipes out there. It’s an easy way to use up any leftovers you may have lingering in the fridge. The reason being is that cooking a good chicken stock is about technique rather than ingredients. So, if you happen to have green beans but no celery, who cares, throw them in the pot instead. There are a few guidelines to follow but don’t worry they are all right here in my post 10 tips for a better chicken stock.

Start with this simple recipe and then let your creative juices flow. Hee Hee, pun intended.

We look forward to hearing how your stock comes out. Send us a comment and share any tips you may use to amp of your stock. P.S. – Don’t forget to claim your free mini-cookbook below!


Print Recipe
Basic Chicken Stock Yum
A simple and delicious chicken stock that lends itself to many uses. Roasted bones and leftover vegetables add a depth of flavor to this frugal recipe.
Course Sauce / Base
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 2-8 hours
Servings
quarts
Ingredients
Course Sauce / Base
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 2-8 hours
Servings
quarts
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Toss vegetables in olive oil, liberally season salt and pepper. Place in 13x9 baking dish with chicken carcass (bones) and skin. Roast for 45 minutes, stirring as necessary to avoid burning.
  2. After roasting, transfer ingredients to a large stock pot. Add garlic, bay leaves and thyme. Cover ingredients with 2" of water. Bring to a slow simmer over low heat. Simmer for a minimum of 1 hour. For best results, simmer stock for 6-8 hours adding additional water as necessary to prevent burning due to evaporation.
  3. Remove from heat when water has reduced by half and bones are falling apart. Strain contents using a fine mesh strainer or cheesecloth. Reserve stock and discard solids. Transfer to storage container and refrigerate/freeze.
Recipe Notes

Caution: Do not overfill pot. Fat from the stock may be flammable if boiled over.

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